News: Naomi Campbell wins “Elephant Polo” libel claim against the Telegraph

31 01 2013

Naomi CampbellNaomi Campbell has won her defamation action against The Daily Telegraph newspaper. The Telegraph had alleged in articles in November 2012 that Ms Campbell planned to organise an elephant polo tournament for her partner’s birthday celebrations in India and was therefore promoting animal cruelty. However, there were never any such plans – Ms Campbell had neither organised nor requested the organisation of any elephant polo tournament. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Court of Human Rights, OOO Ivpress v Russia, Defamation judgments breached Article 10

31 01 2013

4CC6B51C7B08CThe judgment in OOO Ivpress and Others v. Russia (HEJUD [2013] ECHR 67) provides a useful reminder of the importance of distinguishing “value judgments” from “facts” in libel cases and of the importance of engaging in a specific consideration as to whether a publication contributes to a debate of general interest. The case also reminds us of the strict standards which are applied to sanctions against political speech. Violations of Article 10 were found in four linked cases in which the Russian domestic courts had entered defamation judgments against the Ivanovo-Press newspaper. Read the rest of this entry »





Journalisted weekly, week ending 27 January 2013, Cameron’s speech, Andy Murray and Holocaust row

30 01 2013

JournalistedJournalisted is an independent, not-for-profit website built to make it easier for the public, to find out more about journalists and what they write about. It is run by the Media Standards Trust. It collects information automatically from the websites of British news outlets. Articles are indexed by journalist, based on the byline to the article. Keywords and statistics are automatically generated, and the site searches for any blogs or social bookmarking sites linking to each article. Read the rest of this entry »





Leveson’s Arbitration Scheme: not ideal, but workable – Ned Beale

30 01 2013

Leveson Post ConferenceLord Justice Leveson’s Report on the Culture, Practices and Ethics of the Press recommends that claims against the press be resolved fairly, quickly and cheaply by means of an arbitration scheme established by a new self-regulatory body. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Graiseley Properties v Barclays Bank, No anonymity in LIBOR litigation, Article 8 not considered – Lorna Skinner

30 01 2013

BarclaysIn Graiseley Properties Limited and others v Barclays Bank Plc [2013] EWHC 67 (Comm) Mr Justice Flaux refused an application for anonymity orders made by 106 employees and former employees of Barclays in a test case arising from the LIBOR scandal on the basis that they had not established that it was strictly necessary for the proper administration of justice within Article 10(2) [57]. Whilst the outcome is not particularly surprising, the part of the judgment relating to the application of Article 8 is curious and merits further consideration. Read the rest of this entry »





Leveson and Media Policy: A Lost Opportunity? – Damian Tambini

29 01 2013

Lord Leveson report Into Media StandardsSetting up a judge-led inquiry into press standards had a number of advantages when compared to previous government-appointed Royal Commissions on the press, government appointed reviews such as  Calcutt, and Parliamentary Committee Inquiries. Lord Justice Leveson’s Inquiry enjoyed genuine operational independence from both press and government, and legitimacy from all sides of the debate. This was hugely important at a time when there was widespread loss of trust in the ability of politicians to deal with powerful media interests. Read the rest of this entry »





Ireland: I will always know what you did last Summer, Mr Cowen – Eoin O’Dell

29 01 2013

Mail apology to Cowen, via @davidcochraneThe image is a thumbnail of an apology printed in yesterday’s Irish Mail on Sunday; click through for a full-size twitpic by David Cochrane. It is headed “Brian Cowen”, and it consists of four paragraph. The first paragraph (which consists of a single sentence) begins by referring to their story of Cowen’s attendance at the Executive Education Programme at Stanford University which has been the subject of three earlier posts (here, here and here) on this blog, speculating as to the strength of Cowen’s possible complaint to the Press Council of Ireland and the Office of the Press Ombudsman that article invaded his privacy. Read the rest of this entry »