Google’s US Challenge to the Canadian Global Delisting Order – Daphne Keller

9 08 2017

In its Equustek ruling in June, the Canadian Supreme Court held that Google must delete search results for users everywhere in the world, based on Canadian law. Google has now filed suit in the US, asking the court to confirm that the order can’t be enforced there. Here’s my take on that claim. Read the rest of this entry »





The real consequences of fake news – Dominik Stecula

29 07 2017

Fake news, or fabricated content deceptively presented as real news, has garnered a lot of interest since the U.S. presidential election last year. Although hardly a new phenomenon, the global nature of the web-based information environment allows purveyors of all sorts of falsehoods and misinformation to make an international impact. Read the rest of this entry »





Worldwide search de-indexing orders: Google v Equustek – Graham Smith

26 07 2017

The Supreme Court of Canada has issued its decision in Google Inc v Equustek (2017 SCC 34). This is the case in which a small Canadian technology company, Equustek, asked the Canadian courts to grant an injunction against the well-known US search engine ordering it to de-index specified websites – not just on its Canadian domain google.ca, but on a worldwide basis. Read the rest of this entry »





Why licensing journalists won’t end the scourge of ‘fake news’ – Christopher Waddell

19 07 2017

File 20170712 19642 u1ay9iShould journalists be licensed? The Conversation Canada commissioned two articles to argue for and against the idea. The counterpoint of this argument – putting the arguments on the other side – was published yesterday. Read the rest of this entry »





We regulate doctors to protect the public from harm: why not journalists? – David Maslove,

18 07 2017

File 20170630 18613 67f68cShould journalists be licensed? The Conversation Canada commissioned two articles to argue for and against the idea. The counterpoint of this argument – putting the arguments on the other side – will be published tomorrow. Read the rest of this entry »





‘CanadaCreep’ case highlights need for better Canadian privacy laws – Emily Laidlaw

12 07 2017

File 20170628 31267 1c3yd07The story broke in mid-June of “CanadaCreep”, the Twitter account with 17,000 followers that posted photos and videos of unsuspecting women around Calgary.  The kicker was that the material focused on women’s breast, genital and buttocks regions, including “upskirting” videos (filmed up women’s skirts). Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law, Canada: Google Inc v Equustek Solutions, Supreme Court upholds worldwide Google blocking injunction – Hugh Tomlinson QC

2 07 2017

On 28 June 2017, the Supreme Court of Canada handed down judgment in the controversial case of Google Inc v Equustek Solutions  (2017 SCC 34) dismissing (7:2) Google’s appeal against a worldwide injunction ordering it to remove websites from search results (2014 BCSC 1063).  The result of this decision is that worldwide injunction against Google remains in place. Read the rest of this entry »