Politics versus public interest in battle over press regulation – Steven Barnett

6 11 2015

NewspapersFor anyone who cares about journalism in Britain, this November is hugely significant. It could mark a new era of genuinely effective press self-regulation which will both shore up vital public interest and watchdog journalism and protect ordinary people from mistreatment by powerful news publishers. Read the rest of this entry »

Leveson Costs Incentives, Cries of Foul from the Dirtiest Players on the Pitch – Jonathan Coad

28 10 2015

Guy Black takes his seat in the House of LordsHowls of outrage from the press led by Lord Black have apparently persuaded the government to withdraw its statutory stick in the form the Crime and Courts Act 2013 which was passed by our elected representatives to prevail on the press belatedly to join the democratic community and be independently regulated. Read the rest of this entry »

Is Cameron surrendering to press power? – Steven Barnett

23 10 2015

National NewspapersTwo years ago, as most of the UK’s national press were furiously denouncing plans for a new model of self-regulation based on the recommendations of the Leveson report, the Guardian’s Martin Kettle wrote a powerful piece about where power lies in British politics. Read the rest of this entry »

IPSO: Still less for your comfort, another speech by Sir Alan Moses – Jonathan Coad

16 10 2015

Moses-image-3At the end of the Leveson Inquiry, at which only a small proportion of the serial institutional wrongdoing committed by the press was brought to light, the industry was presented with a straight choice.  It could take account of the clearly expressed aspirations of the general public and its elected representatives and create a genuinely independent regulatory body compliant with the reasonable and moderate recommendations of Sir Brian Leveson. Read the rest of this entry »

The Legacy of Leveson and a new era for journalism – Jonathan Heawood

3 10 2015

Lord Justice LevesonThe Press Recognition Panel, the body set up after the Leveson Inquiry to give life to a new system of press regulation, has opened its doors for business. This is good news for the press and the public alike. If a press regulator is recognised by this body, it will be able to offer British journalists effective protection from the chilling effects of bullying litigation and also protect the public by requiring news publishers to adhere to a framework of accountability. Read the rest of this entry »

Government fragments data protection policy and leaves Leveson’s data protection recommendations to rot – Chris Pounder

30 09 2015

DCMSThe transfer of responsibility for data protection policy to the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) is a really bad idea.  It fragments responsibility for data protection policy across three Departments of State and risks reducing the protection afforded to data subjects.  Important data protection recommendations from Leveson will be shelved.  This blog explains why. Read the rest of this entry »

IPSO Chief Executive descends to double speak in an attempt to mask its failure – Jonathan Coad

28 09 2015

Murdoch and IPSOAt the Protecting the Media conference on 24 September 2015 one of the speakers was the IPSO Chief Executive, Matt Tee. He was given a slot to make his case that IPSO was fit for purpose as a genuinely independent and effective regulator. Despite the assumption that he had crafted the best possible case for this proposition, what emerged was further cogent evidence to the contrary. Read the rest of this entry »


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