Murdoch bid for Sky is not just about news – Sally Broughton Micova

15 07 2017

When Ofcom published its report to the media and culture secretary, Karen Bradley, on its public interest test for the proposed acquisition of Sky plc by 21st Century Fox, it rightly found that a takeover would raise public interest concerns. Read the rest of this entry »





Seamus Milne and the ‘Mystery Blonde’: Five years after Leveson the press still ignores privacy – Hugh Tomlinson QC

14 07 2017

On Tuesday 11 July 2017, the Times ran a story under the headline “Corbyn adviser Seamus Milne in clinch ‘with lawyer'”.  The story was illustrated by long lens photographs of Mr Milne and barrister Jennifer Robinson in an East London hotel. Read the rest of this entry »





Should Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013 be in force by now? – Christopher Whitmey

14 07 2017

On 23 June 2017 the Department of Culture Media and Sport replied to a Freedom of Information request, posted on WhatDoTheyKnow, concerning the government’s Consultation on the Leveson Inquiry and its implementation. Read the rest of this entry »





Don’t believe the pundits: it’s too soon to dismiss the power of the red tops – Angela Phillips

16 06 2017

In the aftermath of the UK elections, there has been much speculation that the power of the Tory supporting tabloids is on the wane, diminished by social media and a youth surge to the left. This would be a very sudden demise. After all, it was those very same tabloids that, just a year ago, were credited with pulling off their greatest political coup by convincing large numbers of their working-class readers to vote Brexit. Read the rest of this entry »





Victims or Villains: is the freedom of the press under threat? – Julie Doughty

3 06 2017

This was the question for debate at Cardiff University School of Journalism on 24 May, an event originally envisaged as a discussion on the possible implementation of section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013 as a threat to the freedom of the press or, alternatively, an opportunity for those wronged by the media to find justice. Read the rest of this entry »





Self-regulation of internet intermediaries: public duty versus private responsibility – Paul Bernal

1 06 2017

As the debate over internet intermediary liabilities has rumbled on over the last few years – sometimes quietly, sometimes quite furiously – one group has been the subject of a special squeeze: the public. The role of intermediaries, and in particular search engines and social media services, has been questioned in a number of areas with qualitatively different issues, but in almost all of them similar dynamics exist: lobbyists, governments and the intermediaries fight for their respective corners, and the interests of the public, of the ordinary internet user, are either ignored or minimised. Read the rest of this entry »





The Tories hand the press their get-out-of-jail-free card – Brian Cathcart

18 05 2017

The Conservative election manifesto [pdf] reveals with absolute clarity the depth of Theresa May’s subservience to the billionaire-owned, Brexit-backing corporate national press. Read the rest of this entry »