Privacy and the end of innocence: An alternative perspective on Khuja (formerly PNM) v Times Newspapers – Robert Craig

27 07 2017

This post follows Paul Wragg’s piece on this blog discussing the recent Supreme Court decision determining that the applicant had no right to anonymity after being named in open court by a witness in a high profile criminal case in Oxford. Read the rest of this entry »





Distinguishing harm from misuse in privacy law: Khuja v Times Newspapers – Paul Wragg

22 07 2017

The long-awaited judgment in Khuja (formerly known as PNM) v Times Newspapers Limited is the right decision.  But it was not unanimously decided.  It is on the dissenting judgments of Lords Kerr and Wilson that this post focuses.  Read the rest of this entry »





News: Supreme Court dismisses claimant’s appeal in PNM v Times Newspapers case

19 07 2017

In a judgment handed down today ([2017] UKSC 49) the UK Supreme Court, by a majority of 5:2, dismissed the appeal of the claimant from the refusal of Tugendhat J and the Court of Appeal to grant an injunction to prevent his name being disclosed in connection with a criminal investigation. Read the rest of this entry »





Any reform to the law on Official Secrets must provide robust protection for public interest disclosures and open justice – Lorna Woods, Lawrence McNamara and Judith Townend

28 06 2017

With the election now in the past, the wheels of government are beginning to grind again. While most eyes are on Brussels, it is important that the bright lights of Brexit do not draw attention away from other work that is resuming and ongoing. Among it, the Law Commission will continue its project that considers the revision of the laws on Official Secrets, with its final proposals expected later this year. Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: The right to broadcast court cases, Henri Van Breda, Visvanathan Ponnan and open justice – Dario Milo

27 06 2017

The Henri Van Breda case (Van Breda v Media 24 Limited and Others [2017] ZASCA 97) has confirmed that cameras in courts are not only here to stay, but that this is mandated by the South African Constitution in order to facilitate open justice and the right of the public to hear and see what goes on in our courts. Read the rest of this entry »





Judge flags complaint on behalf of child against journalist who sneaked into hospital – Julie Doughty

30 05 2017

The judgment by Mr Justice Hayden, in Westminster City Council v H ([2017] EWHC 1221 (Fam)) concerning the case of ‘H’, the 15 year old boy at the centre of the Telegraph story we reported on here, was published  on 19 May 2017. Hayden J concludes his short judgment with this: Read the rest of this entry »





Is there any public interest in naming divorcing couples? – Julie Doughty

21 05 2017

In The Times last week, family courts were accused of being ‘secretive’ because they do not advertise the names of people who are getting divorced – under the headline ‘Call to end divorce case secrecy‘ [£]. Read the rest of this entry »