South African business must own up to its part in the corruption scandals – Mills Soko

6 08 2017

South Africa is reeling from a string of scandals involving state owned enterprises and the Guptas, a family with close ties to President Jacob Zuma. A trove of recently leaked Gupta emails exposed the involvement of prominent businesses in the extensive corruption networks. Sibonelo Radebe asked Mills Soko to explain the implications of the scandals. Read the rest of this entry »

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South Africa: The right to broadcast court cases, Henri Van Breda, Visvanathan Ponnan and open justice – Dario Milo

27 06 2017

The Henri Van Breda case (Van Breda v Media 24 Limited and Others [2017] ZASCA 97) has confirmed that cameras in courts are not only here to stay, but that this is mandated by the South African Constitution in order to facilitate open justice and the right of the public to hear and see what goes on in our courts. Read the rest of this entry »





The state of South African journalism: There’s good news and there’s bad news – Alan Finlay

29 04 2017

Wits University’s Journalism and Media Studies Department have just published their latest State of the Newsroom report. The annual publication maps key developments in the South African media landscape – from changes in circulation and audiences, to shifts in media ownership, digital trends in the newsroom, transformation of the news media, political, legal and regulatory issues, and the status of media freedom in the country. Politics and Society Editor Thabo Leshilo asked the editor and lead researcher … The Conversation Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: Comedians fight bill that will limit the freedoms that keep us laughing – Dario Milo

2 03 2017

img-20160501-00392Public comments on the Prevention and Combating of Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill [pdf] were due at the end of January. A coalition of some of SA’s best comedians and satirists has taken a stand against the bill and filed submissions arguing that its hate speech provisions are unconstitutional. Among them are Pieter-Dirk Uys, John Vlismas, Jonathan Shapiro (Zapiro), Kagiso Lediga, Conrad Koch (and Chester Missing), Nik Rabinowitz, Tumi Morake, Joey Rasdien, Nina Hastie, David Kau, Casper de Vries, Celeste Ntuli, Mark Banks, Jason Goliath, John Barker, Christopher Steenkamp and the creators of the satirical programme ZA News. Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: Signal jamming, parliamentary broadcasts, evicting MPs, and access to share registers, the appeal courts speak – Dario Milo

14 10 2016

I acted for Primedia Broadcasting and the South African Editors’ Forum in the appeal to the Supreme Court of Appeal (along with Right2Know and Open Democracy Advice Centre) concerning the now infamous signal jamming and broadcast ban that occurred during last year’s State of the Nation (SONA) address in Parliament. The Supreme Court of Appeal ruled in the plaintiffs’ favour on 29 September 2016 ( [2016] ZASCA 142). Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: Media law and free speech in 2015 and 2016 so far – Dario Milo

1 03 2016

Dario-MiloThe most important case of 2015 for the media in South Africa (even though it didn’t involve the media directly) was City of Cape Town v Sanral, as a result of which, once court documents are filed in court, we can now generally regard them as public documents.   Read the rest of this entry »





South Africa: Review of 2015, Sanral and SAA cases gave weight to media freedom – Dario Milo

14 01 2016

South AfricaLAST year was in some respects an annus horribilis for our young democracy. It began with the State of the Nation controversy in February, when members of the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) were removed forcibly from Parliament for persisting in asking when President Jacob Zuma would pay back the state funds spent on upgrading his homestead at Nkandla. Read the rest of this entry »