Twibel wars: Twitter is not “the wild west” in the eyes of the law – Oliver Lock

5 04 2017

Last month, Mr Justice Warby handed down judgment in Monroe v Hopkins [2017] EWHC 433 (QB), the first libel case to consider the “serious harm” test under section 1 of the Defamation Act 2013 within the context of a social media post.

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Twitter, defamation and “serious harm” – David Rolph

25 03 2017

Twitter may well be the “Wild West” of social media. Certainly, anyone who has spent even a little time on it will be aware that there are a lot of people out there with most decided views who are willing to share them, frequently and stridently. Read the rest of this entry »





How Twitter Works – Appendix to the Judgment in Monroe v Hopkins

12 03 2017

This is the Appendix to the Judgment in Monroe v Hopkins, handed down on 10 March 2017.  It provides a very useful short summary of the workings of Twitter for those who are unfamiliar with the way in which it operates. Read the rest of this entry »





Case Law: Jack Monroe v Katie Hopkins, Success for claimant in Twitter libel case – Nathan Capone

11 03 2017

Food blogger and political activist Jack Monroe has won a defamation claim against Katie Hopkins in respect of two tweets published on Twitter (see the Inforrm case preview). Ms Monroe was awarded £24,000 in damages.  Judgment was handed down by Warby J on 10 March 2017 ([2017] EWHC 433 (QB)), Read the rest of this entry »





Case Report: Jack Monroe v Katie Hopkins, Days 1 and 2: claimant’s evidence and defendant’s closing submissions

1 03 2017

Royal Courts of JusticeThe trial of the case of Jack Monroe v Katie Hopkins (see our case preview from last Friday) began on Monday 27 February 2017 before Mr Justice Warby in Court 13 at the Royal Courts of Justice. Read the rest of this entry »





“I tweet therefore I am … subject to data protection law”? – Brendan Van Alsenoy

14 07 2016

TwitterIn less than 30 years, individuals have transcended their role as passive “data subjects” to become actively involved in the creation, distribution and consumption of personal data. Unless an exemption or derogation applies, individuals are – at least in theory – subject to data protection law. Read the rest of this entry »





Six ways Twitter has changed the world – Sharon Coen, Deborah Chambers, Kirsty Fairclough-Isaacs, Philip James and Richard Jones

20 03 2016

TwitterAfter 10 years of documenting the world in 140 characters, Twitter now has more than 300m active users. This might be far fewer than Facebook’s 1.5 billion, but Twitter arguably has a disproportionate influence on the world, partly because it attracts a significant number of politicians, journalists, and celebrities. Our expert panel explain how their field has been changed by the little blue bird. Read the rest of this entry »